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Posts Tagged ‘移民’

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals – Continuous Residence

August 23, 2012 Leave a comment

One of the criteria to qualify for deferred action as a childhood arrival is continuous residence. Continuous residence will not be considered interrupted is one’s absence is “brief, casual, and innocent.

According to USCIS guidelines, absence will be considered brief, casual, and innocent if it was before August 15, 2012, and:

  1. The absence was short and reasonably calculated to accomplish the purpose for the absence;
  2. The absence was not because of an order of exclusion, deportation, or removal;
  3. The absence was not because of an order of voluntary departure, or an administrative grant of voluntary departure before you were placed in exclusion, deportation, or removal proceedings; and
  4. The purpose of the absence and/or your actions while outside the United States were not contrary to law.

Fees Change for US Visa – April 13, 2013

April 4, 2012 3 comments

According to press release by US Department of State, there will be changes to the visa application fee starting on April 13, 2013. Some of the changes include:

Non-Immigrant Visa Processing Fees

Type of Visa

Previous Fee

New Fee

Tourist, Business, Transit, Crew Member, Student, Exchange Visitor, and Journalist visas

$140

$160

Petition-Based visas (H, L, O, P, Q, and R)

$150

$190

Treaty Investor and Trader visas (E)

$390

$270

Fiancé(e) visas (K)

$350

$240

Border Crossing Cards (age 15 and older)

$140

$160

Border Crossing Cards (under age 15)

$14

$15

Immigrant Visa Processing Fees

Type of Visa

Previous Fee

New Fee

Immediate Relative and Family Preference Applications

$330

$230

Employment-Based Applications

$720

$405

Other Immigrant Visa Applications

$305

$220

Diversity Visa Program Fee

$440

$330

Determining Returning Resident Status

$380

$275

For more information please visit: http://www.state.gov/r/pa/prs/ps/2012/03/187114.htm

 

Why Hire An Immigration Attorney?

January 18, 2012 Leave a comment

An “attorney” is any person who is eligible to practice law in and is a member standing of the bar of the highest court of any State, possession, territory, or Commonwealth of the United States, or of the District of Columbia, and is not suspended, enjoined, restrained, or otherwise  restricted to practice law. Other than being licensed to practice law, below are some reasons why one should hire an immigration attorney over an consultant, agent, or notario.

1. Attorneys are licensed to practice law, legal malpractice by an attorney may lead to him/her losing their license temporarily or permanently.

2. Attorneys have the fiduciary duty to protect and look after the best interest of his or her client.

3. Attorneys are required to keep themselves up-to-date with changes in the law.

4. WRONG HELP CAN HURT

5. Attorney can represent you in court.

Arizona Law Upheld By Supreme Court

May 27, 2011 Leave a comment

The Supreme Court upheld Arizona’s “business death penalty” law in a 5-3 decision on May 26th 2011. The Legal Arizona Workers Act of 2007 is controversial because of a a provision that threatens companies that repeatedly hires illegal aliens with revocation of their corporate charters. It also contains a provision which requires employers to check E-Verify system before hiring new workers.

The significance of this ruling is not only that the Legal Arizona Workers Act of 2007 is constitutional because it is not preempted by federal immigration law. This ruling emphasized that state has the power to use its licensing law to punish EMPLOYERS for hiring illegal immigrants.

This ruling is not directly related to the even more controversial Arizona law involving police power to enforce immigration law against illegal immigrants. The police enforcement law is put on hold by the U.S. 9th Circuit of Appeals.

“Stapling a green card to a diploma would be a very smart thing to do”

May 3, 2011 Leave a comment

Mayor Bloomberg, mayor of NYC, recently made the comment, “Stapling a green card to a diploma would be a very smart thing to do”. He also said that immigrants contribute about $200 billion to New York City’s economy each year and that immigrants comprise more than 30 percent of the city’s professional and managerial work force.

Recognizing the impact immigrants have on US economy is nothing new. This fact is argued by the American Immigration Council (“AIC”) and American Immigration Lawyer Association (“AILA”) in their support of Mr. Badrawi in April 2011.  However, more support is needed for real immigration reform (such as DREAM Act  which was blocked in Dec. 2010) to be passed.

Excerpt From Interview By Maria Prato

April 27, 2011 Leave a comment

A couple weeks back, I was interviewed by Maria Prato of Home News Tribune. Below is an excerpt from that interview:

“For a few, having the right to cast a ballot or the opportunity to travel is all the persuasion they need to evolve from permanent resident status to citizen, said Marco Son, a partner at the Iselin law firm of Son and Keum, which spe­cializes in immigration law. But for many of Son’s clients, citizenship means they no longer have to fear deportation or losing their status of permanent resi­dency, which can result from something as simple as committing a misde­meanor. Citizenship is also a means to sponsor other family members who are looking to permanently live on U.S. soil, he said.”

Since that interview, I had been wondering what are the reason immigrants apply for citizenship. I have set up a poll and is interested in your view and opinion as to why immigrants would want to become citizen.

Green Card Through Family: Petitioning for Sibling (California Process Center)

April 19, 2011 2 comments

In a phone conversation with an USCIS customer service representative, I was notified that due to the large amount of backlog of I-130 in the California process center, there will be very little progress made to Green Card petition filed for siblings in the California process center. So if you filed a petition for your brother or sister in the California process center, do not be TOO concern if the status of your case is stuck at initial review. When the petition is processed, the “priority date” of the petition will be backdated and will reflect when the application is submitted, hence the backlog in the process center should not affect the time it will take to receive green card.

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